Working on the Rogers Farm

Brolly needed!On a blustery day punctuated by a few showers, students from the Otago University Anthropology Society worked at the Rogers farmstead on Hereweka today. With expertise provided by archaeologist Dr Peter Petchey, the team mapped the byre, barn, house and surrounding farm structures. The largely intact but heavily modified byre has a beautiful brick floor and stalls that would have been part of  the Rogers’ family dairy operation. One of the tasks of the Society was to produce a floor plan of this building that would give the Hereweka Trust a better understanding of its historical use.

The work of the Society members is invaluable to the Trust. It provides further insight into the farming activities and the lives of the families that settled and worked in the Hereweka landscape. The Trust are looking forward to having the students visit the area again and are excited about what more they can tell us about this site.

Society Members

Planners and Architects

Architects heading uphill from RutherfordsAn interesting day of visitors at Hereweka with planners from around the country visiting the Larnach Model Farm and getting a feel for the many values of the site. The planners were part of the New Zealand Planning Institute 2016 conference held in Dunedin.

In the afternoon a group of Landscape Architects from the NZ Institute of Landscape Architects spent a sunny afternoon visiting the slopes of Hereweka and walking out to Rutherfords. This was part of their annual conference and a further opportunity to showcase some of the special values of the property.

It’s always great to be able to show the area off to people who have never visited the area and the visit stimulated some interesting thoughts on cultural landscapes and their management from both groups.

Planners 2016

Catchment Field Day at Hereweka

Overview of Smiths Creek

Members of the Trust, Otago Regional Council and Peninsula landowners met to discuss waterway management under the Otago Regional Council’s new Regional Water Plan. The field day was designed to give local landowners an understanding of the plan changes and its requirements. Regional Council staff gave a broad overview of the plan and the reason’s around the plan and how it would affect landowners.  One of the interesting aspects of the field day was the demonstration of electric fishing by Pete Ravenscroft. The electric fishing technique allowed trustees and landowners see the numbers of native Galaxiids in a small waterway such a s Smiths Creek. Land and Water consultant Murray Harris also gave an overview of land management practices that assist farmers around catchment areas. Overall, the field day was very useful and gave trustees an insight into future options for the Hereweka property. (Click on the pictures to view full size).

 

 

Smiths Creek Award

Broad Bay School Toroa Award

Broad Bay School Pupils receive their Toroa Award

Broad Bay School pupils won the Toroa award at the Conservation Week awards on Tuesday 3rd November. Otago Peninsula Trust chairman Ross Smith presented the pupils with the award, which came with $500 in funding for their conservation project at Smiths Creek. The pupils also won the collaboration of a Department of Conservation ranger, who would help with their project. For three years, the school has been involved with the freshwater creek protection and enhancement project at Smiths Creek co-ordinated by Save The Otago Peninsula (STOP). Each winter they have spent a day or more planting native trees to provide shade and absorb agricultural runoff and slow erosion. In the past two years they have provided their own plants and the pupils are eager to continue their work at Smiths Creek, which has also included monitoring the water quality and aquatic habitat.

Broad Bay School pipils monitoring Smiths Creek

Broad Bay School pupils monitoring Smiths Creek